High Tech Holler

December 16th, 2017

Hello podcast listeners!  On today's episode, Rod tells us about his recent trip to Pikeville to visit Bit Source, a recent high tech company formed to train and employ laid-off miners and others in need of work with decent paying jobs that have a future.  We also talk about entrepreneurship as a way to develop new and profitable employment in Appalachia.

You can subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean or on your favorite podcast app.

Follow us on Twitter @myappalachia.

Thanks for taking the time to listen!

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Seth McLaughlin/Herbalism in Appalachia

December 9th, 2017

Hello podcast listeners!  On this week's episode of My Appalachia, we talk with Seth McLaughlin, a nurse practitioner and herbalist.  Seth tells us about common herbs in Appalachia and their uses; other medicinal plants from around the world; and tells some stories about the history and Indian traditions of Appalachian plant use.  Seth is on the faculty of Herbalachia in Johnson City.

You can subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, or on your own podcast app.

Follow us at myappalachia.net or on Twitter @myappalachia.

Thanks for the use of your ears!

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Luke Bauserman/Storytelling in Appalachia

December 2nd, 2017

On this week's episode of My Appalachia, we're pleased to introduce you to Luke Bauserman, blogger, storyteller, author of Some Dark Holler, and who has his own website dedicated to spooky and offbeat Appalachian history, The Weekly Holler; then Rod tells us about his experiences at telling stories in Pound, Virginia, we tell the history of the International Storytelling Center in Jonesborough; finally, we all try our hand at telling y'all a Jack tale!

You can subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts, Tune In, Stitcher or on your own podcast app.

You can follow us on Twitter @myappalachia.

Thank you so much for lending us your ears!

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We’s Talkin’ Here!

November 25th, 2017

It's time for English class, folks...Appalachian English!

On today's episode of My Appalachia, we look at the thing that sets us apart from other Americans, our dialect.  We discuss its origins, some rules of grammar, how we are looked at because of our accent and choice of words and phrases, and we look at words that are peculiar to Appalachian English.  We hope you enjoy...

You can subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Tune In or on your favorite podcast app.

We're on Twitter @myappalachia.

Thanks for lending your ears, y'all!

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Helms Honey

November 18th, 2017

On this week's episode of My Appalachia, Gena chats with Cody and Rene Helms, two young Appalachian entrepreneurs from East Tennessee who have decided to make a business out of beekeeping.  That leads us to a discussion of the uses of honeybees, including helping to reclaim worked out mountaintop removal sites back to a healthy ecosystem.  Gena also explains how to be "one" with the bees, and Rod tells us about other insects that are often mistaken for bees and wasps.  

You can subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean or on your own podcast app.

We're on Twitter @myappalachia.

Thanks for joining us...be sure to let your friends know about our podcast!

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The Holidays Are Upon Us

November 11th, 2017

One of the most well-known holiday traditions in southern Appalachia is the running of the Santa Train, which takes place on November 18th.  Started as a way to show the appeciation of Kingsport, Tennessee, merchants for all the business they got from Southwest Virginia and Eastern Kentucky, the Santa Train has evolved into something akin to Santa and his reindeer, as the jolly old fellow tosses out presents and candy at every stop along the way from Kentucky to Kingsport.

And with the holiday season upon us, we also talk about holiday traditions and superstitions in Appalachia, of which there are many.

You can subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or on your favorite podcast app.

We're on Twitter @myappalachia.

Thanks for listening!

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Monica Neubert

November 4th, 2017

Today on the podcast, we start by introducing you to an amazing immigrant to East Tennessee, Monica Neubert.  Monica had a life altering experience that she shares with Gena, which led her to discover artistic talents she never knew she had.  That leads us to talk about other Appalachians who have gone through similar circumstances, which leads to a discussion of the traditional healing arts in the mountains.  Did you know, for example, that you can charm warts away?  We'll tell you all about it, along with Gena's interview with Monica Neubert of Rogersville, on this episode of My Appalachia.

You can subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Play or on your favorite podcast app.  We're on the web at myappalachia.net and on Twitter @myappalachia.

Thanks for listening!

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Racists, Conferences, Chestnuts And Trails, Oh My…

October 28th, 2017

Welcome in to this week's episode of My Appalachia. Gena is out this week, but Rod and Steve are here to talk about the latest unsuccessful attempt by white nationalists to organize a rally in an Appalachian town, this time in Murfreesboro and in Shelbyville, both in Tennessee; a development conference was held in Pittsburgh to hash out ideas to help bring opportunities to Appalachia; the latest ideas on how to use and rehabilitate the land left over after mountaintop removal; and the Powell River Trail opened up this weekend in the town of Appalachia, Virginia.

You can subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts, Tune In, Stitcher or on your favorite podcast app.

Follow us on Twitter @myappalachia.

Til next we meet, take care, Appalachia!

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The Second Battle of Blair Mountain

October 22nd, 2017

Blair Mountain in West Virginia is the site of a 1921 pitched battle between coal miners and 3000 lawmen and strikebreakers that actually included aerial bombing of the miners.  This battle is the most famous in the mine wars that took place in the coalfields as the UMWA organized the mines against the violent opposition of mine owners.  

Today it is on the verge of being blasted out of existence by those mine operators.  

On this episode of My Appalachia, we talk about Blair Mountain's importance and what you can do to help, which is make your feelings known by sending an email to the National Park Service at Blair_Mt_comments@nps.gov.

This year is also the 40th anniversary of the opening of the New River Gorge Bridge in West Virginia, and this past Saturday was Bridge Day.  We tell you what Bridge Day is and a little bit about its history.

We appreciate you listening to the podcast.

You can subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Play or on your own podcast app.

We're on Twitter @myappalachia.

Again thanks for listening, and be sure to let the Natonal Park Service know what you'd like to see happen with Blair Mountain.

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Sharyn McCrumb

October 14th, 2017

Rod and Steve had the opportunity to speak with Appalachian author Sharyn McCrumb, who was in Kingsport, Tennessee, promoting her latest book, The Unquiet Grave.  Today, we're going to share that conversation with you.

You can subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean or on your favorite podcast app.

We're also on Twitter @myappalachia.

Thanks for listening!

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